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Hispanic construction workers are at the highest risk on the job

Younger Hispanic men are often eager to find stable, decent-paying work so that they can support themselves and their families. They are willing to work hard and put in long hours when necessary to earn a fair wage.

The construction industry obviously feels like a perfect fit for many young professionals. The harder they work, the greater their personal opportunities for advancement and big projects in the future. Unfortunately, construction work is among the most dangerous possible professions.

Every worker in construction has an elevated risk of getting hurt or dying on the job when compared with the average professional in the United States. An analysis of worker injuries and deaths makes it clear that Hispanic construction workers have the most risk out of everyone in the industry.

What do the statistics show?

When you look at the workplace safety statistics for Hispanic construction workers, they paint a very grim picture. Hispanic construction workers, especially those under the age of 30, are at significantly higher risk than others in the same profession.

According to data from the Center for Construction Research and Training, in 2020, Hispanic construction workers had a fatality rate 41.6% higher than non-Hispanic construction workers. The reported injury rate was also 14.5% higher.

What causes this extra risk?

There are numerous factors that contribute to the elevated job risk for Hispanic construction workers. Undocumented workers may unfortunately find that the companies that hire them despite their status are also willing to violate safety rules.

Workers with a language barrier may not understand their rights and may not ask for safety equipment or training that could prevent construction injuries. Highly-motivated young men trying to support their families might also accept more dangerous job tasks than their coworkers in the hopes of establishing a positive impression with their employer or client.

Regardless of how long someone has been on the job or their documentation status, they can potentially qualify for workers’ compensation benefits if they are an employee. If they are not an employee, they may have the right to file a personal injury lawsuit. Learning about trends related to construction injuries can help those in this dangerous profession.